Recent Changes

Monday, May 16

  1. page SuperHero edited HOW TO BE A SUPERHERO - SUPERHERO IN HISTORY Great Costume. Superpower Unparalleled Moral Code …
    HOW TO BE A SUPERHERO - SUPERHERO IN HISTORY
    Great Costume.
    Superpower
    Unparalleled Moral Code
    Secret Headquarters
    Secret Identity
    symbol or logo
    Villains
    sidekick/confidant (someone who knows the secret)
    and a BACK STORY!
    Project Phase 1
    Choose a famous person in history (for our purposes you may choose anyone of historical significance and you may even choose a "bad guy"
    conduct preliminary research, read about the person and their times - understanding their place in history and the times in which they lived
    Write the back story
    Be sure to include a basic biographical outline (it is important that you understand there is "real" history and the mythology you are trying to create and you must blend those two - assume you are telling the "true" story
    include what happened to give your hero their special powers (this is where your research comes in - you need to stay in the time period of your historical figure ie George Washington can not get his powers from an atomic bomb but Ben Franklin could get his from a lightning strike)
    you must include three significant historical events with dates that show off your selections super powers.
    Good Luck

    (view changes)
    11:55 am

Thursday, May 12

  1. page home edited Welcome to Your New Wiki! BEGIN QUARTER #4 TADA - April 4, 2011 Tuesday April 26 Welcome b…

    Welcome to Your New Wiki!
    BEGIN QUARTER #4TADA - April 4, 2011
    Tuesday April 26
    Welcome back -
    Review week and begin review
    release extra credit assignment (see
    you have made it through testing
    good for you
    follow this
    link at right)
    Wednesday April 13
    Video
    - Freedom Summer
    Explore the civil rights movement of the 1960s
    Link
    our next topic is Economics
    you will need
    to rightcreate a wiki - terms and questions follow video
    Monday April 11
    Project work day - complete America Rocked assignments
    read the article
    on your wiki list the person, relavent year
    and turn in to Mr. Lewis
    Tuesday - April 5
    Video - 10 Days that Changed America - When America was rocked
    (see link in margin)
    With Elvis Presley's 1956 TV appearance signafied a whole new culture that involved teenage independence, sexuality, race relations and a new form of music (video
    the theory they are credited with discussion questions)
    Digital free copy of the Fresno Bee CLICK HERE
    Go to Student Login (pictured below)
    (view changes)
    12:48 pm

Wednesday, April 27

  1. page Extra Credit edited Extra credit for week ending May 6 2011 A picture is worth a thousand words - total points poss…
    Extra credit for week ending May 6 2011A picture is worth a thousand words - total points possible 50
    Image collection
    Choose 20 iconic images from American
    point value
    There are monuments to US
    History
    examples
    all over the country and they represent key moments or people at their height and what try to say about the event or how they felt or they are simply uniquely "AMERICAN"
    Project/Opportunity
    1 - choose 20 objects that represent America throughout history
    (ie
    the White House, Washington Monument, Mount Rushmore etc.
    collect
    Monument etc)
    2 - Select
    two images
    the first should be a historical image or illustration showing the object either at its height or under construction
    the second should show the object as it appears today
    3
    - one historic (either picturePlace the two images in a keynote slide
    4 - write a 4 sentence summary of the object
    what is it
    when was it built (year or constructed from - to for multi year objects)
    why was it built
    what is its importance
    or illustration)significance today
    Your presentation should have a title slide with your name
    and one modern upclass period on it
    be sure
    to date (how does the object look today)use quality images
    email link or presentation to Mr. lewis when completed

    (view changes)
    11:57 am

Tuesday, April 26

  1. page Extra Credit edited whowhatwhenwherewhy? If you could spend a day with anyone alive or dead, fictional or imaginary… …
    whowhatwhenwherewhy?
    If you could spend a day with anyone alive or dead, fictional or imaginary…
    Who would you pick?
    What would you do with them?
    When would you meet: in the past, present or future?
    Where would you meet them?
    Why would you pick them?
    Tell us in 100 words or less, and you may win $100 in our second 100-word essay contest. TeenTribune.com and TweenTribune.com will distribute $1,000 in cash prizes. Entries will be judged in ten categories, with separate categories
    Extra credit for each grade, 3rd through 12th.
    New entries: To see the entries that have already been posted, click here.
    Previous winners: To see the winners in our first essay contest about technology, click here.
    Students & teachers: Share on Facebook and Email to your friends and colleagues.
    Teachers: Click for Step-by-step instructions
    One hundred words may not seem like enough, but as Mark Twain said, "I didn't have time to write you a short letter, so I wrote you a long one." He meant that it takes more time and effort to write concisely than to merely fill a page with words. Famous writers conveyed powerful ideas beautifully and succinctly.Students in grades 3-12 created 100-word essays to explain "How technology makes the world a better place." These examples
    week ending May 6 2011 - total points possible 50
    Image collection
    Choose 20 iconic images
    from famous writers andstudentsAmerican History
    examples
    are provided for classroom discussion.
    Prizes: There will be 1 prize of $100 in each grade, 3-12, for a total of 10 prizes. Winning entries will be published on a special page at TeenTribune.com and TweenTribune.com.
    No computers? No time? No problem! If your classroom does not have a computer for every student or if there isn't enough time during
    the school day to enter, then students should submit their entries from home, from a public library, after schoolWhite House, Washington Monument, Mount Rushmore etc.
    collect two images - one historic (either picture
    or as homework. Entries can be submitted 24/7.
    How to enter: Entries must be submitted online to TweenTribune
    illustration) and TeenTribune. No entries will be accepted via email or snail mail. To enter, students must be registered as members of a teacher's classroom by signing up for that classroom. Then students log in, click “Create entry” from the “For Student Links” on the right side of the homepage, then submit their entries for their teachers to judge. Parents may not publish entries of their children. Students cannot publish entries – only registered teachers can publish entries.
    Be creative: Entries may contain an introduction, topic sentences, supporting details or conclusion – but they aren't necessary. Instead, an entry may consists of
    one long sentence, like William Faulkner, or many short sentences like Ernest Hemingway, or silly sentences like Dr. Seuss or no sentences at all like Billy Joel's “We Didn't Start The Fire.”
    But remember, a true artist learns the rules, follows the rules and thinks twice before breaking them.
    Entries can't exceed 100 words. A “word” is any character or group of characters separated on either side by spaces. A contraction counts as 2 words. The entry form will alert you if you exceed the 100-word limit.
    Judging by teachers: Teachers will judge the work of their students, then publish three entries from each of their classrooms. Teachers may only submit three entries per classroom. Entries will be sorted by grade for voting by students. Teachers should choose entries that display passion (think Dr. King) and originality(think Dr. Seuss). That's the rubric.
    Voting by teachers and students: Only registered teachers and the students who signed
    modern up for their classrooms may vote. If you are not registered, you may not vote. Students, if your teacher is not registered, ask your teacher to register now so you can register for their classroom, then vote, before the contest ends. Students and teachers may vote for one entry in each grade, 3-12. Student and teachers may not vote for more than one entry in any one grade.
    Final judging: The staff of TeenTribune and TweenTribune will evaluate the entries that receive the most votes, then select 1 first place winner from each grade category (Grades 3-12) for a total of 10 winners. Entries will be judged by grade, so 3rd grade entries will only be judged against other 3rd grade entries, 4th grade entries will only be judged against other 4th grade entries, etc.
    To prevent the voting from becoming a mere “popularity contest” – in which larger schools have an advantage – the online voting system will prevent any entry from receiving more than 25 votes from any particular school. If an entry is truly worthy of more votes, that entry should receive more votes from students in other schools.
    Eligibility: The content is open to the registered students, Grades 3-12, of all registered teachers. Students, if your teacher is not registered, ask your teacher to register now, before you register and create an entry, because only teachers can publish your entry to be voted upon. Students are not allowed to include their last names when they register or when they submit an entry. Students' names will not appear on TweenTribune.com or TeenTribune.com without parental approval. Teachers must be registered before students can register. If you are a student, ask your teacher if he or she is registered.However, students may not submit requests for registrations for their teachers. Only teachers may submit these requests.
    Teachers, are you registered?
    To be sure you are registered, log in or retrieve your username and password. If you can log in or retrieve your username, then you are registered.
    If you have submitted a request for registration in the past, do not submit another request for registration merely if you don't know your username and password because the registration process skips over all requests from currently registered users. If you aren't sure whether you are registered, or if you don't know your username and password, click to retrieve your username and password.
    If you aren't registered, submit a request for registration now. However, we cannot guarantee that your registration will be processed before the end of this contest because the registration process is not automated and it requires independent verification. Please note that the mere act of submitting a request for registration
    date (how does not guarantee your eligibility. Also, please note that we are not responsible for errors in registration requests, such as misspellings and invalid email addresses. If you submit a request for registration, please proof it before you submit it. To prevent your school from blocking emails from us – including your login credentials – please tell your Internet network administrator and IT staff to “whitelist” this domain and IP address: tweentribune.com and 72.32.2.172
    What's
    the deadline? The staff at TeenTribune and TweenTribune will begin evaluating entries on Monday, February 14, 2011, so teachers should publish their students' entries and students should cast their votes by Friday, February 11, 2011.
    Act now: Students may compose their entries and teachers may publish their entries now, and students may cast their votes as soon as entries are published. This will provide more time for entries to be seen and voted upon by other students.
    Act later: Students may wait to compose their entries and teachers may wait to publish their entries so that students can learn from the entries of other students that were published previously. But these entries will have less time to garner votes.
    Notification of winners: All winning entries will be published by February 28, 2011. Checks will be mailed to teachers' winners after each winner's teacher provides the full name of the winner and the teacher's mailing address. At TeenTribune and TweenTribune, we do not collect students' full names or email addresses to protect students' identities, so the teachers of the winning entrants must identify their students in order for us to distribute prizes. Teachers that fail to provide this information will forfeit prizes for their winning students.
    For teachers, step-by step:
    Make sure you are registered.
    Tell your students about this contest and share these examples.
    If your students are not registered, ask them to register for your classroom using the student sign up link at the top of the homepage. (Log out before using this link.)
    Tell each of your students to log in and create an entry. To enter, students must log in, click “Create entry” from the “For Student Links” on the right side of the homepage, then submit their entries for you to select from.
    Publish 3 entries from each of your classrooms, as follows:
    Log in
    Find the link to “Entries awaiting approval” in the group of links labeled “For Teacher Links” on the right side of the homepage beneath the list of topics.
    Tick the boxes adjacent to the three entries you want to publish.
    Select “Publish the selected entries” from the pulldown.
    Click the “Update” button.
    Important note: After you publish 3 entries from a classroom, you will not be able to publish any more entries from that classroom, so choose carefully.
    See the published entries. New entries may take up to 10 minutes to appear on the page with previously published entries. You may search using the students' usernames.
    Special education: Special education students are welcome to participate, but there are no special categories or allowances made for reading level vs. grade level in this contest. However, we invite Special Ed teachers to email us with alternatives to allow more special education students to participate in future contests.
    And finally…We've tried to make this contest as fair and useful as possible. We began by asking thousands of teachers for input and hundreds of them responded with excellent suggestions for which we are grateful. But we recognize that there may be room for improvement, so please help us to make our next effort even better by emailing your suggestions to us.
    Thank you!
    object look today)
    (view changes)
    1:04 pm
  2. page home edited Welcome to Your New Wiki! QUARTER #3 ENDS - April 1, 2011 Spring Break - April 18 to 25 2011 …

    Welcome to Your New Wiki!
    QUARTER #3 ENDS - April 1, 2011
    Spring Break - April 18 to 25 2011
    BEGIN SEMESTER #2 - JANUARY 24, 2011

    BEGIN QUARTER #4 - April 4, 2011
    Tuesday April 26
    Welcome back -
    Review week and begin review
    release extra credit assignment (see link at right)

    Wednesday April 13
    Video - Freedom Summer
    (view changes)
    8:45 am

Monday, April 11

  1. page home edited ... BEGIN SEMESTER #2 - JANUARY 24, 2011 BEGIN QUARTER #4 - April 4, 2011 Wednesday April 13 V…
    ...
    BEGIN SEMESTER #2 - JANUARY 24, 2011
    BEGIN QUARTER #4 - April 4, 2011
    Wednesday April 13
    Video - Freedom Summer
    Explore the civil rights movement of the 1960s
    Link to right - terms and questions follow video
    Monday April 11
    Project work day - complete America Rocked assignments and turn in to Mr. Lewis

    Tuesday - April 5
    Video - 10 Days that Changed America - When America was rocked
    (view changes)
    11:42 am
  2. page Freedom Summer edited ... Students will explore the role of Freedom Summer in the Civil Rights Movement. They will learn…
    ...
    Students will explore the role of Freedom Summer in the Civil Rights Movement. They will learn about the organized efforts of groups such as CORE (Congress of Racial Equality) and SNCC (Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee) and the role of young Americans in changing the country, despite the persistent threat of violence.
    VOCABULARY:
    Disenfranchised
    Climax
    Conspiracy
    Literacy
    Segregation
    Eulogy
    Painstaking
    Rhetoric
    Reputed
    Disenfranchised, Climax, Conspiracy, Literacy, Segregation, Eulogy, Painstaking, Rhetoric, Reputed, Racism, Civil Rights, , Integrate, Jim Crow Laws, Poll Tax, Literacy Tests, Black Muslims, BPP (Black Panther Party), CORE (Congress of Racial Equality), NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People), NUL (National Urban League), SCLC (Southern Christian Leadership Conference), SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee), Stokely Carmichael, James Farmer, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. , Elijah Muhammed, Bobby Seale, Roy Wilkins, Sit-ins, Freedom Rides, Rioting, Law Suits, Writing, Marching, Boycotts
    DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
    1. Freedom Summer was part of the larger Civil Rights Movement of the mid- twentieth century. Why do you think this movement necessary?
    ...
    2. Why do you think the Voting Rights Act mentioned the 15th Amendment? (Bonus research: read the text of the 15th Amendment and compare/contrast its provisions with that of the Voting Rights Act.)
    Follow this link (http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/big/0621.html#article) for the New York Times June 22, 1964 reporting on the disappearance of Michael Schwerner, James E. Cheney and Andrew Goodman.
    ...
    Student Non-Violent Coordinating
    Coordinating
    Committee (SNCC)
    Follow this link (http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=100) to access the full text of the Voting Rights Act of 1865.
    WEBSITES
    ...
    of CORE http://www.core-online.org/history/history%20opening.htm
    http://www.core-online.org/history/history%20opening.htm
    Images of
    ...
    Hate http://www.newseum.org/mississippi/
    Civil

    Civl
    Rights in Mississippi Digital Archive
    http://www.lib.usm.edu/~spcol/crda/index.html
    The Mississippi Burning Trial
    (view changes)
    11:38 am
  3. page Freedom Summer edited FREEDOM SUMMER On August 4, 1964, the bodies of three Civil Rights workers, Michael Schwerner, Ja…
    FREEDOM SUMMER
    On August 4, 1964, the bodies of three Civil Rights workers, Michael Schwerner, James E. Chaney and Andrew Goodman, were found in a dam on a farm near Philadelphia, Mississippi. The three young men had disappeared six weeks earlier on June 21, 1964. These murders shocked Americans as news reports of these cold blooded killings circulated throughout the nation. The men had been ambushed by the Ku Klux Klan in retaliation for their participation in a massive drive to register African American voters known as Freedom Summer. This moving one-hour documentary explores the events of that summer, including the disappearance and murder of Schwerner, Chaney and Goodman, and the contributions of the brave men and women who stared down Jim Crow. The events of that summer marked a turning point in U.S. history and in the Civil Rights Movement, mobilizing American society and helping spur Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This special program provides educators and their students with a gripping depiction of the United States in this watershed era. Freedom Summer would be an outstanding introduction to the Civil Rights Movement, giving students a complex view of the violence and hope of these years, and the transformations one summer inspired throughout the nation and the world.
    OBJECTIVES:
    Students will explore the role of Freedom Summer in the Civil Rights Movement. They will learn about the organized efforts of groups such as CORE (Congress of Racial Equality) and SNCC (Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee) and the role of young Americans in changing the country, despite the persistent threat of violence.
    VOCABULARY:
    Disenfranchised
    Climax
    Conspiracy
    Literacy
    Segregation
    Eulogy
    Painstaking
    Rhetoric
    Reputed
    DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:
    1. Freedom Summer was part of the larger Civil Rights Movement of the mid- twentieth century. Why do you think this movement necessary?
    2. Describe and define Freedom Summer. Why do you think activists decided to focus on registering voters? What other issues could they have chosen to highlight?
    3. Mississippi was called the “last frontier” of the Civil Rights Movement. Why? Why do you think it was chosen as the focus of Freedom Summer?
    4. One of the aims of the Civil Rights Movement was to overturn the Jim Crow system of the South. What was Jim Crow? Was segregation legal? Discuss.
    5. Civil Rights workers tried to help African-Americans in the South register to vote. What were some of the obstacles African-Americans faced when trying to register to vote? Discuss the constitutionality of these obstacles.
    6. Who was Medgar Evers? Why was he assassinated? 7. Although white students helped to bring media attention to the Civil Rights
    Movement, there were some complications. Discuss the pros and cons of white
    students going down South to be a part of Freedom Summer. 8. The Ku Klux Klan targeted Michael Schwerner for assassination. Why? What
    did Schwerner do to upset the Klan?
    9. Lyndon B. Johnson was president of the United States during Freedom Summer. How did Johnson deal with the events of Freedom Summer?
    10. Were you surprised by the violence the Civil Rights Movement provoked? Why do you think the KKK and others reacted so violently? Discuss.
    11. Discuss the legacy of Freedom Summer. What were its consequences for American society overall?
    ACTIVITIES:
    1. Follow this link (http://americanradioworks.publicradio.org/features/oh_freedom/) to the American Radio Works website where you can listen to a three-part special on Freedom Summer and see a slideshow.
    2. In small groups, research and review the major events of the Civil Rights Movement leading up to and including the summer of 1964. Create a timeline illustrating the events of Freedom Summer. These timelines can be in Powerpoint format, poster-board, or any other creative medium. Share these projects with the larger class or group.
    3. What do your older relatives remember about Freedom Summer and the Civil Rights Movement? Interview older members of your family or your community about their recollections and/or experiences of Freedom Summer and the Civil Rights Movement.
    4. Using a medium of your choice, design a memorial for Michael Schwerner, James E. Cheney and Andrew Goodman.
    PRIMARY SOURCE EXPLORATIONS:
    Excerpt of theVoting Rights Act (1965)
    In the wake of the tragic events of Freedom Summer, Congress signed the Voting Rights Act into law on August 6, 1965. After reading the excerpt below, ask students to consider the questions which follow.
    AN ACT To enforce the fifteenth amendment to the Constitution of the United States, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That this Act shall be known as the "Voting Rights Act of 1965."
    SEC. 2. No voting qualification or prerequisite to voting, or standard, practice, or procedure shall be imposed or applied by any State or political subdivision to deny or abridge the right of any citizen of the United States to vote on account of race or color.
    1. What does Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act argue? What kind of “qualifications” for or “prerequisites” to voting existed before this act was passed? How do you think it was enforced?
    2. Why do you think the Voting Rights Act mentioned the 15th Amendment? (Bonus research: read the text of the 15th Amendment and compare/contrast its provisions with that of the Voting Rights Act.)
    Follow this link (http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/onthisday/big/0621.html#article) for the New York Times June 22, 1964 reporting on the disappearance of Michael Schwerner, James E. Cheney and Andrew Goodman.
    Spirituals played a large role in the Civil Rights Movement. Follow this link (http://otter.middlebury.edu:8080/ramgen/amcivmedia/civil_rights_music/sncc_WokeUp. rm) to listen to the members of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) singing a spiritual.
    Follow this link (http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=100) to access the full text of the Voting Rights Act of 1865.
    WEBSITES
    The History of CORE http://www.core-online.org/history/history%20opening.htm Images of Hope and Hate http://www.newseum.org/mississippi/
    Civil Rights in Mississippi Digital Archive
    http://www.lib.usm.edu/~spcol/crda/index.html
    The Mississippi Burning Trial
    http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/price&bowers/price&bowers.htm
    AricanAmericans.Com: August 4, 1964: Three civil rights activists found dead
    http://www.africanamericans.com/CivilRightsSlaying.htm

    (view changes)
    11:25 am
  4. page America Rocked edited ... 2. How do you think American race relations and rock ‘n’ roll music were intertwined? What inf…
    ...
    2. How do you think American race relations and rock ‘n’ roll music were intertwined? What influence do you think the Brown v. Board of Education decision had on the United States more broadly?
    Extended Activities (PROJECT):
    ...
    BIOGRAPHY (Individual or group project):): Choose one
    2. BUSINESS AND SOCIETY: Examine the relationship between the music industry and social change. You may look at Memphis radio stations that introduced “race” music to white audiences, study the history of Sun Records, or the contemporary response to Presley appearing on the Ed Sullivan Show. Some topics to consider are: segregation in Memphis, the impact of music on social change, the role of teenagers in pop culture, the changing nature of race relations in the 1950’s. You may use PowerPoint or an overhead projector to present your findings.
    3. MUSICAL HISTORY OF ROCK ‘n’ ROLL: Where did rock’n’roll come from? Presley sang music inspired by gospel, blues, jazz, and country and western. Create a recording for your class that provides samples of these different genres in American history, and end with some samples of Presley’s early music. Provide “liner notes” to accompany your recording, including artist credits, song title, and dates of performance, and an analysis of the influence of each genre on the development of early rock’n’roll and its chronological story.
    (view changes)
    10:56 am

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